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Building Your Resume

ABTSolutions has learned over the years what works and what doesn't work on a resume.

ABTSolutions has learned over the years what works and what doesn't work on a resume.

Building Your Resume

Building Your Resume

"You never get a second chance to make a first impression"

Someone said that… Oscar Wilde? Will Rogers? My Grandfather for sure! And every recruiter in the world!
Your resume is likely the hiring manager’s introduction to you…their “first impression.” For this reason, it is important to spend the time and energy to create a document that does the job… giving the manager a reason to keep reading.
What is a resume? According to Miriam Webster, a resume is a “short document describing your education, work history, etc., that you give an employer when you are applying for a job…a list of achievements…a short description of things that have happened.”
Notice the words “brief” and “short” in Webster’s definition? The reason for that is simple: most people who read resumes will give up after 6 seconds. SIX SECONDS. Unless you give them a reason to keep reading… 7 seconds… 8… 9… your resume will end up with most resumes… in a trash can or a drawer or a pile on the credenza… never to be seen again.
Think of your resume as “self-advertisement,” your personal billboard, and a most important piece of your job application because it gives the manager a glimpse of how you can make a contribution in their organization.
A resume is not an autobiography. It is a well thought out, precise and concise overview of the skills and abilities you bring to the table that enabled you to accomplish specific results. Do not try to include everything there is to know about you because they won’t read it. Give them enough to know they want to know more.
A resume is not a long, boring list of your job responsibilities and a long boring list of companies where you worked. More about that later.
A resume is a document that differentiates you from all other candidates by defining the contributions you have made in your current and/or previous roles.
A resume can make the difference between getting interviewed for the position you want and being summarily dismissed; eliminated from consideration.
It is seldom useful to include personal information like hobbies. Better to work this into a conversation, if it gives you something in common with the interviewer.
Including a photo is strongly discouraged.
Use one font throughout the document. Text should be black.
Don’t try to be creative or cutesy unless you are an artist.
Don’t try to tell everything. Tell enough to get the interviewer’s attention. An effective resume provides a summary of qualifications that will encourage the employer to invite you to interview for the position. Be ready to fill in all the blanks when you speak.

So take the time to do it right. Here’s how…

How to build your resume. Since most people will focus on the top third of the first page, you will want to load the highlights of your work history into that area. Here’s how to build an effective technical resume:
Someone said that… Oscar Wilde? Will Rogers? My Grandfather for sure! And every recruiter in the world!
Your resume is likely the hiring manager’s introduction to you…their “first impression.” For this reason, it is important to spend the time and energy to create a document that does the job… giving the manager a reason to keep reading.
What is a resume? According to Miriam Webster, a resume is a “short document describing your education, work history, etc., that you give an employer when you are applying for a job…a list of achievements…a short description of things that have happened.”
Notice the words “brief” and “short” in Webster’s definition? The reason for that is simple: most people who read resumes will give up after 6 seconds. SIX SECONDS. Unless you give them a reason to keep reading… 7 seconds… 8… 9… your resume will end up with most resumes… in a trash can or a drawer or a pile on the credenza… never to be seen again.
Think of your resume as “self-advertisement,” your personal billboard, and a most important piece of your job application because it gives the manager a glimpse of how you can make a contribution in their organization.
A resume is not an autobiography. It is a well thought out, precise and concise overview of the skills and abilities you bring to the table that enabled you to accomplish specific results. Do not try to include everything there is to know about you because they won’t read it. Give them enough to know they want to know more.
A resume is not a long, boring list of your job responsibilities and a long boring list of companies where you worked. More about that later.
A resume is a document that differentiates you from all other candidates by defining the contributions you have made in your current and/or previous roles.
A resume can make the difference between getting interviewed for the position you want and being summarily dismissed; eliminated from consideration.
It is seldom useful to include personal information like hobbies. Better to work this into a conversation, if it gives you something in common with the interviewer.
Including a photo is strongly discouraged.
Use one font throughout the document. Text should be black.
Don’t try to be creative or cutesy unless you are an artist.
Don’t try to tell everything. Tell enough to get the interviewer’s attention. An effective resume provides a summary of qualifications that will encourage the employer to invite you to interview for the position. Be ready to fill in all the blanks when you speak.

So take the time to do it right. Here’s how…

How to build your resume. Since most people will focus on the top third of the first page, you will want to load the highlights of your work history into that area. Here’s how to build an effective technical resume:


YOUR NAME
you@mail.com ~ (555)555-5555 ~ somewhere, FL


YOUR DESIRED TITLE (e.g., SOFTWARE DEVELOPER or WEB DESIGNER, etc.)

Brief overview of your qualifications. This is a statement that highlights your primary skills, abilities, experience and what qualifies you for the position, focusing on what prospective employers are seeking. This is a 3-4 sentence “branding statement” that tells the reader who you are, what you bring to the table and where you fit in the organization. (Objective statements are obsolete. Do not include one.)

• List of bulleted statements stating your most significant achievements.
• To the extent possible, quantify your results.
• These accomplishments differentiate you from the rest of the world and offer some “proof” that you will be able to deliver, if hired.
• List relevant technical skills
• Don’t list skills you no longer use
• Don’t list skills which are not relevant to the jobs you seek
(If you can, arrange these bullets in 2 or more columns)


Highest Degree, College or University, Location
Next highest degree, college or university, location

Professional Highlights (or Experience Summary)
(list all relevant certifications)


Company Name (not bold), Location                Date - Date
Job Title (bold)
•Major accomplishment - project, action taken, result. (managers are looking for problems you solved and how the solution impacted the organization)
•   don’t list your responsibilities.
•   everyone has responsibilities.
•   list what you delivered. that’s what makes you different from someone else who had a similar job with similar responsibilities.
Technical Environment: list technologies and methodologies employed at this company.

Company Name, Location                                 Date - Date
Job Title
• go back 10 years
Technical Environment: list technologies and methodologies employed at this company.



Finally, if you feel it will be valuable to list memberships in professional organizations/associations, do so after the experience summary.

Here are a couple sample resumes:


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